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Green men and medieval beasts

Richard Mabey goes on a church crawl to discover nature-based iconography in East Anglia

Green men and medieval beasts SIMON KNOTT

Dickleburgh Screen, dog catching rabbit

Dickleburgh Screen, dog catching rabbit

THE VILLAGE OF WOOLPIT (from an Old English word for wolf-trapping pits) could stake a good claim to be the folkloric epicentre of Suffolk. There is a sacred well. The village sign commemorates the legend of the Green Children, a twelfth century story of a boy and a girl who emerged from one of the parish wolf pits into a harvest field. Their skins were green, and they refused all food and communication until they were offered beans. When they had learned English they said they had come from a land of perpetual twilight, beyond a great river.

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worship

Our faithful friends

Janice Tindale outlines a pet service with the theme of faithfulness and trust

bible study

First witness

Kay Butler interprets Mary Magdalene’s experience of the events of Easter

meditation

All things of creation

are children of the Father 

St Francis of Assisi